The Beatitudes are the most poetic of Jesus Christ’s teachings. The Sermon on the Mount Matthew 5-7 is his teaching about what a follower of His looks like.

Many fundamentalist Christians get in an uproar when  they have to take a statue of the 10 commandments down but they have never once tried to put up a statue of the beatitudes. I have always wondered why that was?

Could it be that they really don’t want to be meek, want to thirst for justice, or fight for peace?  This blog is on Matthew 5:3 and 5:5

What does “Blessed are the poor in spirit” mean?

The Billy Graham Evangelical Association put it this way  “In other words, when we come to God, we must realize our own sin and our spiritual emptiness and poverty. We must not be self-satisfied or proud in our hearts, thinking we don’t really need God. If we are, God cannot bless us. The Bible says, “God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble” (James 4:6).

God opposes the proud but gives grace to the humble. We are supposed to love the things that God loves and opposed to the things that He is opposed too.

There are many words that describe the Republican nominee for president of the United States and humble is not one of them. Proud is however.

A follower of Christ knows that he is empty spiritually. He or she knows that without Jesus in his heart that he or she is nothing.

I know that I am a sinner. I know that I am empty without Him. But I know that I need to repent every time I let Him down.

Trump however at a family leadership summit in Ames Iowa  last year said “Why do I have to repent or ask for forgiveness, if I am not making mistakes?”

To support a man who thinks that church is someplace where you eat a cracker and drink some wine. My church will have communion tomorrow.  I am not going to eat a cracker and drink some wine. I am going to eat a wafer that repents the body that Jesus laid down to save me. I am going to drink some grape juice that represents the precious blood that he gave when He was crucified.

I am also going to do this in love and reverence not to have “fun”